For reasons as diverse as wish fulfilment, group cohesion, predictive model building, and good humour, we habitually animate and humanise our environments, betting on the most meaningful interpretation available. As placeholders for disorienting experiences and inexplicable natural phenomena, ancient deities too fell in love, married, had children and extramarital affairs that spawned more children, broke down and away, fought, rode horses, 𝘣𝘶𝘵 𝘪𝘧 𝘤𝘢𝘵𝘵𝘭𝘦 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘩𝘰𝘳𝘴𝘦𝘴 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘭𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘴 𝘩𝘢𝘥 𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘥𝘴, 𝘰𝘳 𝘤𝘰𝘶𝘭𝘥 𝘱𝘢𝘪𝘯𝘵 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘪𝘳 𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘥𝘴 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘤𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘵𝘦 𝘸𝘰𝘳𝘬𝘴 𝘴𝘶𝘤𝘩 𝘢𝘴 𝘮𝘦𝘯 𝘥𝘰, 𝘩𝘰𝘳𝘴𝘦𝘴 𝘭𝘪𝘬𝘦 𝘩𝘰𝘳𝘴𝘦𝘴 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘤𝘢𝘵𝘵𝘭𝘦 𝘭𝘪𝘬𝘦 𝘤𝘢𝘵𝘵𝘭𝘦 𝘢𝘭𝘴𝘰 𝘸𝘰𝘶𝘭𝘥 𝘥𝘦𝘱𝘪𝘤𝘵 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘨𝘰𝘥𝘴' 𝘴𝘩𝘢𝘱𝘦𝘴 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘮𝘢𝘬𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘪𝘳 𝘣𝘰𝘥𝘪𝘦𝘴 𝘰𝘧 𝘴𝘶𝘤𝘩 𝘢 𝘴𝘰𝘳𝘵 𝘢𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘧𝘰𝘳𝘮 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘺 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘮𝘴𝘦𝘭𝘷𝘦𝘴 𝘩𝘢𝘷𝘦, or so goes the critique of Greek popular religion attributed to the monotheist philosopher Xenophanes, of early 5th century BC. After Jesus there were Teletubbies, HAL 9000 and the subsequent hype and fallacy of Al, abominable snowmen, and an ever-growing menagerie of celluloid pets that throw hands across contemporary animated blockbusters. Beyond enacting situational comedy archetypes and occasionally unsettling insipid social routines, here the 'human' is able to once again become a site of amoral disturbance, rather than being a model of exemplary behaviour. Parents might worry that little brat Peppa the Pig sets a dreadful example for their children, but its too late now. Where brands mimic popular girl behaviour to gain consumer trust, animals are employed in advertising their own open fire grill demise, eat me eat me eat me come back here you bint, the animals aren't complaining, so what's your problem? Another day is trouble in itself.

Text by Masha Ryabova








Photos by Jaakko Myyri